Luanda

By bus
By bus

The National Bus Service has just re-opened but routes are not organized yet. There are some local services in Luanda and in between cities.

By plane
By plane

Despite the city's very low tourist number, it has a surprisingly large number of international connections, which largely service Angolans living abroad such as Brazil and the growing number of firms servicing the oil and diamond industries as well as reconstruction done largely by Chinese workers and Brazilian firms. A couple of carriers still operate routes based on Cold War alliances to Havana & Moscow.

The city is the hub of national carrier TAAG Angola Airlines, one of just three profitable airlines in Sub-Saharan Africa, which offers flights to 15 Angolan cities. They offer flights to many cities in West-Central/Southern Africa including daily flights to Johannesburg as well as Douala, Cameroon; Sal, Cape Verde; Bangui, CAR; Kinshasa, DRC; Brazzaville & Pointe Noire in the Congo; Windhoek, Namibia; Sao Tome, Sao Tome and Principe; Lusaka, Zambia; Harare, Zimbabwe. Their long-haul offerings include: Dubai, Beijing via Dubai, Lisbon, Paris, and trans-Atlantic flights to Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, and Salvador de Bahia in Brazil.

Aside from TAAG, two Angolan airlines Air Gemini & SonAir serve about a dozen airports each around the country. International service includes flights to/from: Frankfurt Lufthansa, London-Heathrow BA, Paris-de Gaulle Air France, Windhoek Air Namibia, Brussels Brussels Airlines, Havana Cubana, seasonal, Moscow Aeroflot, Dubai Emirates, begins 25 Oct. 09, Beijing Hainan, via Dubai, Addis Ababa Ethiopian, Lisbon TAP Portugal.

Delta Air Lines was to commence weekly flights from Atlanta via Sal in June 2009, but delayed its large African expansion until 2010 due to the financial crisis. TAAG was removed from the EU blacklist in July 2009 and as of Aug 09 is expected to introduce more flights to Europe in the near future specifically London-Gatwick. The airline had sought to begin a service to Houston, USA when it received new Boeing 777-200ERs in 2006, but was rejected for its poor maintenance/safety record.

When leaving the country do not take any Kwanza to the airport as it is illegal to try to take Kwanza out of the country; you may be stopped by the fiscal police and receive a heavy fine all your Kwanza taken and most of your other money or imprisoned.

By ship
By ship

As of 2007, there was a ferry operating from Luanda to the Cabinda exclave, useful to avoid a transit of the DRC. It takes 14 hours and costs $180 including a bike, so you may be better off flying.

By train
By train

There are a few short passenger lines, but they are not very safe. Angola once had the most extensive rail network in Africa while under colonial rule. All but a couple short link fell into grave disrepair during the war for independence and civil war. It is currently undergoing extensive reconstruction and modernization by Chinese firms and should be restored to its former glory in the early 2010s.

By car
By car

The main road for tourists will be the coastal highway leading north to the DRC and South to Namibia. It is very scenic and in reasonably good repair. Roads are one of the top priorities in reconstruction efforts, including a handful of six-lane highways leading out of the city. Expect a mix of okay pavement on old highways and a smooth ride on new roads.