Bangladesh

By plane

By plane
By plane

There are quite a few rotor-wing craft services available for hire in Bangladesh for tourism, MEDEVAC or Film-footage services. Any reputable travel agent will know full details. As of now - one service "ATL" is at, ATL (http://www.nitolniloy.com...) or at ATL (http://www.atlhelicopter.com/).

By plane
By plane

Air travel in Bangladesh is very affordable and convenient. As with most flights, the earlier you book, the better your fare. Flight time is nearly always less than 1 hour, but can save many hours of tedious and dangerous road travel. Dhaka’s domestic terminal lies next to the International Terminals, within easy walking distance. Check in normally is open from 60 until 30 minutes before departure. The terminal is small, and with few diversions, so don’t arrive too early.

There are airports in all of the division capitals and in Jessore, Cox's Bazar and some other small cities. United Airways BD Ltd (http://www.uabdl.com/) operate the most flights, with smaller private operater Regent Airways (http://www.flyregent.com/...) also competing. National airline Biman (http://www.bimanair.com/) also fly domestic routes, although with the retiring of their sole small jet, frequency and range of destinations has dropped significantly. Chittagong is often served with wide body aircraft enroute to the Middle East. Currently, all air routes in the country operate via Dhaka.

All three airlines offer online booking and e-tickets.

Despite the short distances, on board service is generally good, with water and juices, as well as small snacks handed out. Aircraft used on domestic routes are mainly Western built ATR and Dash prop aircraft.

By train
By train

Bangladesh Railways (http://www.railway.gov.bd/) is the state and only train operator. The ticket prices are reasonable and usually similar to bus ticket prices and sometimes even cheaper. However, due to the roundabout routes and tricky river crossings, the journey durations are usually much longer. Tickets can be booked over the phone, though unless you speak Bengali you're likely to get better results at one of the computerized station booking offices.

Trains are generally comfortable, with more leg room than buses. Though the carriages are generally not very clean, the AC and 1st class seats are manageable. Sulob class is the highest 2nd class ticket, with reserved seating and not much different from 1st class except in price.

Kamlapur Rail Station in Dhaka is large and modern. It serves all major cities but due to the existence of broad gauge and meter gauge tracks around the country it may be required to change trains en route.

By car
By car

Driving in Bangladesh is not for the faint hearted - the road network is fairly good, but dodging irrational bus drivers and weaving in and out of rickshaws isn't easy on the nerves. Driving standards are some of the worst in the world, as notable by the many cars which have bumper bars that encircle the whole car. Traffic in Dhaka has reached unimaginable proportions, and self-driving is definitely not advised. Parking places are non-existent. It is highly advised to hire a local driver. Night time driving is substantially more dangerous as trucks/buses often ignore smaller cars; road travel at night should be avoided, regardless of who's driving.

Officially, cars drive on the left; in reality, cars drive on any side of the road. The speed limit is 25 km/h on all urban roads, though it is highly unlikely a vehicle will even reach this speed with the traffic. Many traffic lights have been installed in recent times, but these are often disregarded by both drivers and traffic police. Traffic police direct cars on all major intersections in urban areas. On many country roads, it is illegal to overtake; but again, this is completely ignored, with locals employing extremely dangerous manoeuvres when passing the vehicle in front of them. The cities are well lit, but country roads often lack street lighting. Some new inter-city roads have tolls, especially new bridges; these are fairly cheap.

By ship
By ship

There are over 230 mighty and small rivers throughout the country, and boats and ferries are an integral part of travel for locals and tourists alike. A journey along the river in any mode is probably the best way to see Bangladesh. There are a number of private tour operators offering river sightseeing trips of various lengths, or using the ferries to get between cities is a great way to see the country at a moderate pace.

The Rocket Steamer service connects Dhaka and Khulna via Barisal, and is a fantastic way to enjoy riverine Bangladesh, for those who prefer the scenic route. The 4 ferries are operated by BIWTC (http://www.mos.gov.bd/biw...) and run several times per week in each direction. It's advisable to book several days in advance if possible. While there are several different classes it's unlikely that you will end up in anything but 1st or 2nd class. Both of these consist of around 10 small berths on the upper deck of the boat with 2 beds each and a sink no doubt doubling as a urinal, and fairly clean shared bathrooms. There's a central dining/sitting room in each class with a chef cooking Bengali meals and the odd fish-and-chips or an omelette for around Tk 50-150. Cheaper food can be bought at the vendors in the lower classes on the bottom level. First class is at the front of the boat, with the bow made into a nice sitting area. If you're traveling single you must book 2 beds if you want a berth guaranteed to yourself in either class, though unless the boat is completely full it's unlikely they'll put someone in a foreigner's room even if you just pay for one. The full journey takes anywhere from 26-30 hours and costs Tk 1010/610 in first/second class. It's best avoided during the rainy seasons and during holidays when the launches get over crowded with home-returning city dwellers. The more eco-friendly may prefer to take their trash off with them: otherwise, it's likely to end up in the river at the end of the journey.

BIWTC also operates many other more basic ferries that may be useful for smaller distances.

By bus
By bus

Local Bangladeshi buses are generally crowded, often to the extent of people riding on the bus steps entrance and sometimes even the roof. The state run Bangladesh Road Transport Corporation (http://www.brtc.gov.bd/) BRTC buses usually fall into this category. Avoid all of the low cost buses - they are easy to spot by their poor condition. There are daily fatal accidents involving them. If you do use them, it is worth noting that they do not usually stop, but rather slow down slightly to let passengers on or off. Additionally, fare collectors, disconcertingly, do not wear uniform making them difficult to identify. If you do not speak the language you may have to simply jump on the bus literally and give money to the first person who asks you.

However, there are luxurious air conditioned bus services connecting major cities and popular tourist destinations. Green Line (http://www.greenlineparib...), Shyamoli (http://shyamoli.paribahan.com/), SilkLine (http://www.paribahan.com/...)? and Shohagh (http://www.shohagh.com/group/) usually have a couple different offices dotted around the cities they serve. Greenline has a few Scania buses running between Dhaka, Chittagong and Cox's Bazar that offer a level of comfort you've probably never seen in a bus before - they cost about 1/3 more than their Volvo buses, but are comparable to business class on an airplane, at least. More comfortable and expensive buses use the same over crowded roads, and have the same suicidal drivers as the cheaper buses.

Bus stations are often very busy and disorganised. The main Sydabad station in Dhaka is extremely chaotic. The approach to the “station” can take many hours due to the lack of paved roads, street lights, traffic lights and decorum. You should take care when hainvg luggage stored in the hold of buses, even on the better carrier that will tag your bag. Things do go missing (taken off early, or even, not loaded in the first place. Make sure you out your suitcase in yourself, ideally first, so other luggage is in a thieves firing line.