Rewalsar

Act like a local

act like a local
Touch the Ganesh

Between the dhabas and momo shops on the left side of the street as you go from kora café toward the nyingma gompa, up a short flight of stairs is a well kept painted carving of ganesh. locals take off their shoes before touching their head to connect with ganesh’s spirit and receive his blessing.

act like a local
Take a kora - Walk around the lake

Locals of every stripe take walks around the lake – it is part exercise, part social interaction, part ritual. most go clockwise around the lake – with the lake always to your right side. sometimes you’ll notice the sikhs going in the opposite direction. buddhist do three rounds, three times per day for a total of nine. you will often see tibetan women picking up worms and insects to remove them from harms way. many carry a mala, which they use to keep track of mantras which they chant as they walk around. people often chant om mani padme hum, the mantra of compassion, and om ah hum vajra guru padma siddhi hum, the mantra of padmasambhava, guru rinpoche.

act like a local
Turn prayer wheels

All the monasteries and the small temple to padmasabhava on the lake have prayer wheels. prayer wheels contain mantras printed on paper, and spinning the wheels send the blessings of the mantras out into the world to bless all sentient beings.

act like a local
 

Often they are in groups of 9, 27, or 108. They are always spun in a clockwise direction. Spinning prayer wheels accumulates merit the Buddhist terminology for doing good things that will benefit you in your next life, and you can, if you’re feeling generous, dedicate the merit you accumulate to all sentient beings, which multiplies the merit even more.

act like a local
Feed the fish

The fish in tso pema lotus lake are among the luckiest in the world. tourists and locals spend rs. 10 and feed them biscuits and crackers and puffed rice all day long. they are well trained, so even the sound of the bell from the temple on the lake in the morning sends them into a frenzy of mouth opening competition to get the most morsels. it is quite a spectacle, and good karma to feed the fish too.

act like a local
Meditate in Mandarava’s Cave

A hidden gem in rewalsar is mandarava’s cave. just as you pass norbu’s café on the lake side of the road, there is a sign on the next building pointing to the left. down that unassuming alley is a rock with om mani padme hum painted on it, and to the left, there is a notice board and a door. knock on the door, and sometimes you will be rewarded by finding the nun who guards and lives in the cave in a receptive mood. she will usher you in to the cave, and, depending on unknown and unseen forces, will allow you to stay for as long as you like or usher you back out quickly. just sitting for a moment in the cave will give you a sense of mandarava’s power and compassion – one person described it like receiving a warm hug from a loving and caring mother.

act like a local
 

There is a path within the fence, though it has collapsed due to erosion from the rains, so at times you have to find a path through the high grasses on the side. Around the lake are also several pavilions where groups often have teachings, and people sit and talk, picnic, or pray.

act like a local
Respect the Cow and Tree

Near the hindu temple is a sacred tree, where devotees light candles on special days, and hindus bow and touch their head to the platform surrounding this tree for blessings. around the corner, there are two statues of cows, and also likely to be some live cows as well. all are treated with reverence and respect.

act like a local
Go to the local pujas

Most of the monasteries do not mind if you walk into the temple while they are doing puja – as long as you are respectful and quiet, it is even welcome.

act like a local
 

Sometimes there is space along the sides so that you can sit to listen and watch the puja as well. On ceremony days – the 10th, 15th, 25th, and 30th of the lunar calendar, there is often tsok – offerings to deities and enlightened masters of the lineage. They will often give tsok to visitors or have a bin where you may help yourself. Tsok is to be treated with respect – it is thought of as food that was offered to deities, so should be eaten mindfully, and never thrown away if it can be helped. If you cannot eat it for some reason, you can give it to a beggar or feed it to the fish.

act like a local
Climb to Padmasambhava’s cave

If you enjoy a challenging walk, definitely do the climb to padmasambhava’s cave. it is arduous, but it is very quiet and, during monsoon season, the rushing water of the waterfalls serenades you as you climb up. the path begins behind the statue. instead of going up into the statue, continue up the stairs along the side of the statue. they curve around the back and come up on a road. across the road, some stairs continue upward. keep following the stairs – for the most part, the path is pretty obvious, often it is alongside or even in the river that cascades down during monsoon, or is a dry bed of stones after monsoon season. the locals will always point you in the right direction if you look lost.

act like a local
 

Two hours Trekking to Naina Devi temple is an enjoyable experience. On way there are many Buddhist caves and lakes. If the climb seems too daunting then you can take the easy option and jump on a bus all the way up to the caves and Naina Devi Temple above. The bus ride takes about half an hour and departs from from the Rewalsar bus stand.