Belarus

Belarus is not a large country, and a traveller can reach from one side of its border to the other in less than a day.

By train
By train

Travelling by train around the country will get you to a lot of desired destinations relatively cheaply and quickly make sure that you book an express train. Also, you will get a chance to capture a glimpse of Belarusian nature, as the forests and plains often start right on the edges of the cities. Notice how there are almost no elevations in this part of Europe - it is all vast green plain. Do not count on being lucky to spot wild animals by the railway tracks - they are normally afraid of loud noises and savage passengers.

Regional trains 'diesels' run during the day. They're not quite as fast as buses, but make up for it in price. Long-distance trains mostly run during the night. The standard class is плацкарт platskart formed of bunks all along the carriage, while купе kupe offers individual compartments with just four bunks. The lowest class is общий obshchy which is seated, so make sure not to book this if you're going to be travelling all night, unless you're on a really tight budget! Train tickets are best bought a few days in advance.

By car
By car

You can rent cars in Minsk at the airport or city from the major international rental chains or smaller local companies. Petrol is relatively cheap by European standards. 1 litre is

Please note that, since July 1, 2013, On the Toll roads, foreign vehicles and all vehicles over 3.5 tonnes have to have an On Board Unit in the car. You can buy it at a Costumer Service Point. The rates and places of Costumer Service Points are on the website BelToll System

By bus
By bus

Travelling by road will get you far, since the infrastructure in Belarus was well developed after World War II. Inter-city bus tickets can be bought from the bus station which is easily found in all big cites and rarely sell out before the day of departure. Buses leave from 'platforms' which are numbered, so check your ticket for the platform number. There may be as many as 20 or more platforms, many of which aren't immediately visible, so don't just stand outside and wait for the bus to pull up. A fare for a long-distance journey might be around BYR100,000 about USD11 if bought from a bus station. There are local buses too in towns larger cities may have trams and/or trolleybuses, and Minsk has a metro too which run fairly frequently: simply get on and the conductor will come and find you. Fares for these are typically not more than BYR2000 USD0.25.

There are also a network of little minibuses known as a маршрутка, marshrutka, typically painted yellow, which are generally cheaper than local authority buses. Seats on inter-city ones can be reserved by phone. Local ones work like buses, only smaller.