Iceland offers many hiking opportunities. Hiking in Iceland is no easy business, strong walking boots which support your ankles are recommended as the terrain is usually craggy lava rock or springy moss with hidden holes! Likewise, you'll need to be prepared for strong bursts of sideways rain and sleet, especially in winter and shoulder seasons, and particularly in the mountains. Don't stray into unknown terrain without proper equipment, read up more on hiking in Iceland.

Iceland is not well known for skiing or big ski areas but the town of Akureyri in the north has a great little ski area and the mountains of the Troll Peninsula offer world class terrain for ski touring, ski mountaineering and heli skiing.

Ice climbing is great with world class frozen waterfalls and plenty of glaciers.

Glacier hiking is one of Iceland´s most popular tourist things to do with the area of Skaftafell in the SE being the center of activity.

Whale watching available all year from Reykjavik and during the summer from Husavik, but sightings are most common in summer in either place.

There are some good opportunities to go mobiling and this can provide access to otherwise inaccessable areas.

Whitewater rafting is popular. In south you can raft on the big Hvita river. North Iceland has some of the best rivers for rafting, Vestari and Austari Jokulsa. The companies offering rafting are located in Varmahlid. One of them is Bakkaflot with really good facilities hot pools, accommodation restaurant & drinks to use after your adventure.

Work permits are required for citizens of most countries. The exceptions are citizens of the Nordic Countries Greenland, Faroe Islands, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and EU/EEA countries. There are no restrictions on the latest entrants into the EU.

Work permits can be extremely difficult to get if you do not come from any of the aforementioned countries, as Iceland has a relatively strict immigration policy and employers are obligated to consider Icelandic or EU citizens above all other applicants. It is also worth mentioning that as a small nation, a great deal of emphasis is placed on family ties and personal relationships; therefore it can be difficult to find a job in Iceland without personally knowing someone in a company.

Beware of offers for contracted work in Iceland. Your wage levels may be lower than average and your rights may be affected. Iceland is a highly unionised society with over 90% of the workforce in labour unions.

A great resource is the Directorate of Labour (http://www.vinnumalastofn...) website.