The currency in Serbia is the dinar RSD, динар, pl. dinari/динари. Coins are minted in values of 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 dinars, and banknotes are printed in values of 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, and 5000 dinars. The banknotes tend to be more common than the coins, so be prepared to carry around a large number of banknotes in varying conditions.

Money can be exchanged at official exchange offices, locally called menjačnica, often carrying the emblem of the National Bank of Serbia outside the building. The rates here are usually better than those of the banks. It is much easier to convert Euros or other major currencies. There are many ATMs, which accept foreign bank and credit cards without a glitch. Visa, Visa Electron, Mastercard and Maestro are widely accepted. However, American Express and Diners Club cards are rarely accepted. Likewise, traveler's cheques are not a well known form of payment in Serbia and cashing them in could present a challenge.

The dinar is not widely convertible outside Serbia; it is advisable to re-convert your remaining dinars to Euros or other major currencies before leaving the country.

Old Yugoslavian currency can be purchased from street sellers. A RSD500,000,000,000 note makes an interesting souvenir. At Kalemegdan, near the fortress in Belgrade, you can pick up a set of 10 banknotes from the hyperinflation era for RSD500.

Imported western food is available in many supermarkets, especially in the Croatian-owned "Idea".

In nearly all Serbian pharmacies apoteka, you can buy prescription drugs without prescription.

Prices tend to be on par with the rest of the Balkans. However, import taxes make clothes and shoes in Serbia very expensive.