Cayman Islands

Hurricanes are possible from June through November.

Despite being more liberal than other Caribbean islanders, Caymanians are still relatively conservative. Public displays of affection both Gay and Straight are not usually acceptable. Acceptance of homosexual tourists is relatively new and visitors should refrain from any sort of public displays of affection. In past years Gay cruise ships have been barred from calling in the Cayman Islands, but recent policy is to remain non-discriminatory. Gay visitors can expect the same levels of hospitality and service as any other visitor, but should expect some hesitation from older Caymanians. Young Caymanians are very liberal and for the most part, won't care either way.

The Cayman Islands is a "relatively low-crime area, especially compared to other vacation destinations in the Caribbean".

"However, that being said, crime is on the rise on Grand Cayman. Walking or riding a bicycle at night along dark roads for example, along Courts Road puts one at risk for assault and/or robbery. Pedestrians also need to worry about being hit by cars along soft shouldered roads. Drunk driving/Hit and Run accidents have been a problem. The Royal Cayman Islands Police Service RCIPS regularly conducts roadblocks to deter and detect drunk driving, making numerous arrests most weekends. DWI/DUI is a serious offence in Cayman.

The capital city of George Town is generally safe. Tourists should avoid certain areas Rock Hole, Swamp, Jamaica Town/ Windsor Park, Courts Road, and Eastern Avenue and this shouldn't be a problem as these areas are all well out of the way for most activities. In addition, George Town is virtually deserted at night as there are few centrally located restaurants, bars, or nightclubs.

One need not be overly concerned about miscellaneous belongings. While at the beach, no one will be stealing your lunch, towel or sneakers. Cayman thieves are not desperate individuals, and have no interest in normal personal effects or used snorkelling gear. Very likely the thieves are just local teens looking for items that they can sell to other local teens. Example: An average pair of sunglasses will not "grow legs"; But a flashy pair of Chanel knock-offs just might!

Special note to women: Women travelling alone should be especially careful at night, as sexual assaults do occasionally occur. Carry a cell phone capable of emergency calls to local 911. If you feel you are being followed or inappropriately watched, you should immediately call the police. The RCIPS is a very responsive and extremely professional organization. They will take your complaint seriously.

Grand Cayman is no longer a Camelot. But not to worry. You can enjoy a relaxing and "incident-free" holiday if you take care to be aware of your surroundings and lock doors and windows when possible.

Many locals won't eat barracuda because it is likely that it is poisonous. Be aware of that. Other reef fish groupers, amberjack, red snappers, eel, sea bass, and Spanish mackerel are not likely to cause ciguatera fish poisoning.

No natural fresh water resources; drinking water supplies are met by desalination plants and rainwater catchments.

Make sure you have sunscreen on if you plan on walking around town. It is sunny all year.


Caymanians are very respectful and well known for being a very welcoming people. Greetings and pleasantries are common and expected, even to shopkeepers when entering their stores. Most islanders use titles of respect, such as Mr. and Miss, followed with the given or first name, when addressing other islanders. It is not uncommon on Grand Cayman island to hear the question "Who you fa?" hoo – yoo – fah It's part of the local dialect that means “Who you belongs ta?” Definition: 1. Who are you, and who are your parents, siblings, grandparents, etc. (http://www.caymanislands....)


The Commonwealth variety of English is the official written language and the local creole is spoken by virtually everyone. Native Caymanians have a pleasant and unique accent with many charming turns of phrase. For example, in Cayman rumours are not heard "through the grapevine", instead they're heard "along the marl road". Locals pronounce Cayman as Kay-MAN, and not KAY-min.