Brazil

Brazil's unit of currency is the Real pronounced 'hay-OW', plural Reais 'hay-ICE', abbreviated BRL, or just R$. One real is divided into 100 centavos. As an example of how prices are written, R$1,50 means one real and fifty centavos.

Be careful using credit cards in Brazil. Many people have their cards compromised and then over several days have money siphoned off their cards. A safer option is to use cash make sure you only withdraw from bank ATMs such as Banco do Brasil. If you choose to use your credit card, keep an eye on your statement.

Foreign currency such as US Dollars or Euros can be exchanged major airports and luxury hotels bad rates, exchange bureaus and major branches of Banco do Brasil no other banks, where you need your passport and your immigration form.

Look for an ATM with your credit/debit card logo on it. Large branches of Banco do Brasil no withdrawal fees for credit cards usually have one, and most all Bradesco, Citibank, BankBoston and HSBC machines will work. Banco 24 Horas is a network of ATMs and also Santander Banks which accept foreign cards charging R$ 10 per withdrawal. Withdrawal limits are usually R$ 600 Bradesco or R$ 1000 BB, HSBC, B24H, per transaction, and in any case R$ 1000 per day. The latter can be circumvented by several consecutive withdrawals, choosing different "accounts", i.e. "credit card", "checking", "savings". Note that most ATMs do not work or will only give you R$ 100 after 10 PM.

In smaller towns, it is possible that there is no ATM that accepts foreign cards. You should therefore always carry sufficient cash.

Wiring money to Brazil can be done through Western Union (http://www.westernunion.com.br) transfers to be picked up at a Banco do Brasil branch in most cities, and also quite a few exchange offices.

Travellers' checks can be hard to cash anywhere that does not offer currency exchange.

A majority of Brazilian shops now accepts major credit cards. However, quite a few online stores only accept cards issued in Brazil, even though they sport the international logo of such cards.

In Brazil it is very common for credit cards being used like debit card. So, when you pay using card commonly you will hear the question: "Crédito ou débito?Credit or debit?". Debit card is like as paying cash.

Some places put signs stating a minimum card value payment. This is illegal. Every commercial establishment that accepts card is required to accept payment regardless of the amount. If the merchant that accepts cards refuses to receive the payment due to the low value, call the police or PROCON consumer protection agency.

Coins are R$0.05, R$0.10, R$0.25, R$0.50 and R$1. Some denominations have several different designs. Images from the central bank of Brazil (http://www.bcb.gov.br/?MO...). And more (http://www.bcb.gov.br/?MO...). Bills come in the following denominations: R$1 being phased out, R$2 , R$5 , R$10 still a few plastic red and blue around, R$20 R$ 50 and $100. Images from the central bank of Brazil (http://www.bcb.gov.br/?CE...).

It is also very common to receive the change pay back for cents with candies for example, R$ 0,05 or R$ 0,10.

Starting in the first half of 2010 with the bills of 50 and 100 reais, all Brazilian bills will start circulating with a new design by 2012. You are likely to find both versions circulating together for the next few years.

shopping

It's not a bad idea to pack light and acquire a Brazilian wardrobe within a couple of days of arrival. It will make you less obvious as a tourist, and give you months of satisfied gloating back home about the great bargains you got whenever you are complimented on your clothing. Brazilians have their own sense of style and that makes tourists - especially those in Hawaiian shirts or sandals with socks - stand out in the crowd. Have some fun shopping, and blend in. Another good reason for buying clothes and shoes in Brazil is that the quality is usually good and the prices often cheap. However, this does not apply to any foreign brand as imports are burdened by high import taxes - therefore, do not expect to find any good prices on brands like Diesel, Levi's, Tommy Hilfiger, etc. To figure your Brazilian trousers size, measure your waist in centimeters, divide by 2, and round up to the next even number.

Store windows will often display a price followed by "X 5" or "X 10", etc. This is an installment-sale price. The price displayed is the per-installment price, so that, "R$50 X 10", for example, means 10 payments typically monthly of R$50 each. The actual price is almost always lower if you pay in cash.

Make sure any appliances you buy are either dual voltage or the same as in your home country. Brazil is 60Hz, so don't buy electric clocks or non-battery operated motorized items if you live in Europe or Australia. The voltage, however, varies by state or even regions inside the same state. see Electricity below.

Brazilian-made appliances and electronics are usually expensive or of poor quality. All electronics are expensive compared to European or US prices.

Brazil uses a hybrid video system called "PAL-M." It is NOT at all compatible with the PAL system of Europe and Australia. Television began in black and white using the NTSC system of the USA and Canada, then years later, using PAL for its analogue colour -- making a totally unique system. Nowadays, most new TV sets are NTSC compatible. However, the newly-introduced digital TV standard is not compatible with that of most other countries. Digital video appliances such as DVD players are also compatible with NTSC all digital colour is the same worldwide, but make sure the DVD region codes, if any, match your home country Brazil is part of Region 4. Prices for imported electronic goods can be quite expensive due to high import tax, and the range of domestic electronic gadgets is not very wide. Also, be aware that the term "DVD" in Brazil is both an abbreviation for the disc itself and for its player, so be specific to avoid confusion.

Although the strength of the Real means that shopping in Brazil is no longer cheap, there are still plenty of bargains to be had, especially leather goods, including shoes remember sizes are different though. Clothes in general are a good buy, especially for women, for whom there are many classy items. Street markets, which are common, are also a very good option, but avoid brand names like "Nike" - you will pay more and it's probably fake. Don't be afraid to "feel" an item. If it doesn't feel right, most likely it isn't! Beware of the dreaded "Made in China" label. If there's none, it's probably Brazilian, but be aware: some Brazilian-made products are less robust than their American or European counterparts.

For moviegoers in Brazil, all cinemas offer 50% discount for students, even foreign students. All you need is to show your student card or ISIC card from your home country!

exchange rates

The Real is a free-floating currency and has become stronger in the past few years. Especially for US citizens, prices based on exchange rates have increased quite a bit. As of July 16, 2015, R$1 was worth about:

US$0.31

€0.29

£0.20

There are many federal regulations for dealings with foreign currency, trading in any currency other than Real in Brazil is considered illegal, although some places in big cities and bordering towns accept foreign money and many exchange offices operate in a shady area. In addition, exchange offices are almost impossible to find outside of big cities. Currency other than USD and EUR is hard to exchange and the rates are ridiculous. If you would like to exchange cash at a bank, be prepared to pay a hefty commission. E.g., Banco do Brasil collects US$15 for each transaction regardless of amount.

souvenirs

Similar to the rest of Latin America, hand-crafted jewelry can be found anywhere. In regions that are largely populated by Afro-Brazilians you'll find more African-influenced souvenirs, including black dolls. Havaianas jandals are also affordable in Brazil and supermarkets are often the best place to buy them — small shops usually carry fake ones. If you have space in your bags, a Brazilian woven cotton hammock is a nice, functional purchase as well. Another interesting and fun item is a peteca, a sort of hand shuttlecock used in a traditional game of the same name, similar to volleyball.