Chile

The legal drinking/purchasing age of alcoholic beverages is 18, and is strictly enforced.

Wine: Chile produces some excellent wines, competing with France, California, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand for world markets. Notable are the Cabernet Sauvignon and Carmenere in red, along with whites from the Casablanca valley. In fact, the Carmenere grape/wine was thought of as being extinguished in its native France and the rest of the world, but was actually rediscovered in Chile.

Mote con Huesillo: A delicous summertime drink made of wheat seeds mote and dried peaches huesillos boiled, sweetened, and served cold. Typically sold on sidewalk or park stands.See here

Chilean Pisco: Brandy made from Muscat grapes. Popular brands are Capel, Alto del Carmen, Mistral and Campanario.

Mango Sour: Pisco mixed with mango juice.

Piscola: Pisco mixed with Coke.

Borgoña: Red wine and strawberries.

Terremoto: "Earthquake": a typical Chilean drink that consists in a mix of pineapple ice cream with pipeño local white wine, sometimes including fermet or granadine or even rhum. A smaller version of the drink is known as Réplica "aftershock".

Tsunami or Maremoto: A variation of the "Terremoto" made with pipeño, beer, pisco and ice.

Schop: Draught beer.

Fan-Schop: Beer mixed with orange Fanta or Orange Crush soft drink. A refreshing alternative on a hot summer day. Used to be stereotyped as a girl's drink.

Beers: Cristal and Escudo are the most popular light lagers. Royal Guard is a fair bit tastier, Kunstmann is on pair with European imported beer.

Jote: wine and Coca-Cola.

Vino navegado: Chilean version of mulled wine. Mixes warm red wine, orange slices, sugar, spices and sometimes cloves. There's a very known conflict between Chile and Peru about the origin of Pisco. Although Pisco was registered as a Chilean drink for some countries in the last century, it is historically Peruvian in origin for much longer. Further, Chilean and Peruvian drinks are not the same product, they have different manufacturing procedures, different varieties of grape and not the same taste.

There's a very known conflict between Chile and Peru about the origin of Pisco. Although Pisco was registered as a Chilean drink for some countries in the last century, it is historically Peruvian in origin for much longer. Further, Chilean and Peruvian drinks are not the same product, they have different manufacturing procedures, different varieties of grape and not the same taste.

Unlike other Latin American countries, in Chile it's illegal to drink in unlicensed, public areas streets, parks, etc. The laws also restrict vendor hours depending on the weekday in no case after 03:00 or before 09:00.

Still, Chileans drink a lot of alcohol so don't be surprised to see one a litre bottle of liquor per person.